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Abdeen Palace Museum
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Abdeen Palace was originally built on land belonging to an Ottoman Turkish nobleman named Abdeen Bey. The palace became the center of the royal court, rather than the Citadel of Cairo (which had been the center of Egyptian government since the Middle Ages) during the reign of King Fuad I. It is part and parcel of Egypt’s heritage back to 1863 as was built on a 25-feddan area by Egyptian, Italian, French and Turkish architects , the stately grandeur of this palace owes to its construction in 1863 at a time when a worldwide cotton shortage meant huge revenues for Egyptian cotton exports. In 1872 the lush and luxurious palace became the seat of the government and It served as a royal palace until the end of the monarchy in 1952, when it became the home of the president. No one can ignore that Abdeen Palace is one of the most famous palaces that were erected during the reign of Mohamed Ali Pasha Dynasty. It was the seat of the government as of 1872 till 1952. During such eventful period of time . Khedive Ismail ordered the palace be erected in 1863, and the palace was named after Abdeen Bay, one of the army commander under Mohamed Ali Basha. In 1872, Khedive Ismail moved to Abdeen Palace, leaving the castle, old seat of Egypt’s government, that was built by Saladdin Al Ayoubi in 1171. And today the Abdeen Palace Museum stands as an evidence to Egypt's active role over times.

Abdeen Palace witnessed unforgettable events that undoubtedly affected Egypt’s modern and contemporary history. For this reason In the 1980s, President Hosni Mubarak decided to restore the decaying building and turn it into a weapons and medals museum, a process that was interrupted by a major earthquake in 1992. Housing every conceivable means of killing an enemy, the weapons section is always a hit with young males. Its extensive collection of knives, guns and cannons, as well as ingenious combinations, is impressive and well-labelled. Another section is dedicated to a large, and somewhat monotonous, exhibit of medals and gifts presented to President Mubarak on various occasions, as well as a museum of ancient weapons and a third of the medals and orders of merit bestowed on members of Egypt’s formal royal family and eminent Egyptian figures. Abdeen Palace is considered one of the most sumptuous palaces in the world in terms of its adornments, paintings, and large number of clocks scattered in the parlors and wings, most of which are decorated with pure gold.

The impressive Abdeen Palace in Cairo, now a museum complex, houses a Silver Museum, an Arms Museum, the Royal Family Museum, the Presidential Gifts Museum and the more recent Historical Documents Museum.The stately grandeur of this building owes its construction in 1863 to a time when a worldwide cotton shortage meant huge revenues for Egyptian cotton exports. It served as a royal palace until the end of the monarchy in 1952, when it became the home of the president. In the 1980s, President Hosni Mubarak decided to restore the decaying building and turn it into a museum complex. Among the museums, the Arms Museum is the most striking, featuring every conceivable means of killing an enemy, as well as plenty of medals, a collection of knives, guns and cannons.