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Amada Temple
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Amada Temple
The Amada temple is located 20 KM to the south of Wadi es-Sebua, the area had also the temple of El-Derr and the tomb of Aniba.  Amada is located at 115 KM to the south of Aswan. The Temple of Amada, the oldest Egyptian temple in Nubia, The temple was first constructed at the time of the new kingdom by pharaoh kind Thtmaosis III and Amenhotep II, of the 18th dynasty and dedicated to Amun and Re-Horakhty. His son and successor, Amenhotep II continued the decoration program for this structure.

It was dedicated to the god Amon Ra, and RA Hor –Ahkty.  Additions were made later on by king Thutmoes IV and    it was renovated at the time of king Seti I . In this temple king Thuhmosis II venerated the middle kingdom king Senusert III of the 12th dynasty, honoring the victorious campaigns that king Senusert have made in the land of Nubia .

History
The Temple of Amada, the oldest Egyptian temple in Nubia, was first constructed by pharaoh Thutmose III of the 18th dynasty and dedicated to Amun and Re-Horakhty. His son and successor, Amenhotep II continued the decoration program for this structure.

Amenhotep II's successor, Thutmose IV decided to place a roof over its forecourt and transform it into a pillared or hypostyle hall. During the Amarna period, Akhenaten had the name Amun destroyed throughout the temple but this was later restored by Seti I of Egypt's 19th dynasty. Various 19th dynasty kings especially Seti I and Ramesses II also "carried out minor restorations and added to the temple's decoration." The stelas of the Viceroys of Kush Setau, Heqanakht and Messuy and that of Chancellor Bay describe their building activities under Ramesses II, Merneptah and Siptah respectively.

Amenhotep II's successor, Thutmose IV decided to place a roof over its forecourt and transform it into a pillared or hypostyle hall. During the Amarna period, Akhenaten had the name Amun destroyed throughout the temple but this was later restored by Seti I of Egypt's 19th dynasty. Various 19th dynasty kings especially Seti I and Ramesses II also "carried out minor restorations and added to the temple's decoration." The stelas of the Viceroys of Kush Setau, Heqanakht and Messuy and that of Chancellor Bay describe their building activities under Ramesses II, Merneptah and Siptah respectively.

What to see  
The original building plan for the structure featured a pylon, forecourt and a portico which led to a sanctuary. However, when Thutmose IV roofed the open forecourt, the pillars and walls "were decorated with offering scenes, with those involving Thutmosis IV on the left" and Thutmose III and Amenhotep II on the right. Although the temple has a dull and crumbling exterior, its interior features enjoy some of the most finely cut reliefs with bright and vibrant colours.

The finest painted reliefs are in the innermost section of the temple where Thutmose III and Amenhotep II are shown being embraced or making offerings to various Egyptian gods. The left hand side of the vestibule shows Amenhotep II being crowned by Horus and Thoth and running with an oar and a hap (or navigational instrument). The cult room at the side of the sanctuary contains some interesting foundation and consecration scenes for the temple which depict "the ritual of the 'stretching of the cord', the ceremonial making and laying of bricks, and the offering of the temple to its gods."

Getting There
Cruising the Lake Nasser is an enjoyable way to see serene desert vistas and a variety of temples.  The Amada temple of Thutmose III and Amunhotep II, displays a vivid collection of brightly painted reliefs of the kings before gods. The sandstone temple is dedicated to Amon- Re & Re- Harrakte. This temple has been moved 2.5 KM from its original site.

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